Dum Dum Doughnuts come to Brighton!

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We are really excited to be working with Dum Dum Doughnuts – the world’s first artisan baked doughnut brand and the fastest growing doughnut brand in the UK. An independent British company with a celebrity following, which includes Olympian Tom Daley, Dum Dum Donutterie will open their first UK store outside London in the heart of Brighton on Friday November 18th.

This is how good they look!

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Dum Dum Doughnuts look amazing, taste great and are lots of fun – it’s not uncommon to witness queues round the block outside a Dum Dum Donutterie! Plans for the Brighton outlet include the exclusive ‘Brighton seaside doughnut’.

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The high quality, natural artisan doughnuts are uniquely baked fresh every day (not fried) and each outlet remains open until all the doughnuts have sold out.  Dum Dum Doughnuts use only natural ingredients and are significantly lower in fat, half the fat in some instances, than competitor brands. This is because they are not cooked in oil, but instead baked using a unique patisserie-based patented baking process. Dum Dum’s are not claiming to be a healthy doughnut, but by using good ingredients and modern techniques they are making an indulgent treat even tastier, without the junk.

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We can’t wait until they open!

Graphics of Punk Exhibition at The Museum of Brands

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MuseumOfBrands Graphics of Punk Exhibition

This month we were asked to create a PR campaign for a new pop-up exhibition focussing on the rich variety of graphic art that emanated from the punk era, The Graphics of Punk, which recently opened at the Museum of Brands, Packaging and Advertising in London and will run until the January 29, 2017.

The exhibition forms part of a year-long celebration of the 40th anniversary of the punk movement. It will feature record sleeves and posters from the seminal bands of the time, including The Sex Pistols God Save The Queen, designed by Jamie Reid (1977) and the Great Rock’n’Roll Swindle poster designed by M. Hirsh (1979). The exhibition also includes the graphics of The Clash, The Buzzcocks and The Damned.

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A number of key underground alternative magazines forms a part of the exhibition, giving an authentic insight into other ways which the graphics of punk were used at the time. The 1970s was a decade full of outrage and agitation.  Both Oz magazine and IT (International Times) were prosecuted for obscenity in 1970, and were found guilty.  Spare Rib took up the cause of women’s liberation and drew widespread criticism from the establishment. The underground press supported causes such as immigration, abortion, squatters and the miners’ struggle. These radical campaigns draw a visual parallel between the political climate of the time and its punk graphics aesthetics.

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The Museum will also be hosting various events themed around typography and fashion, to coincide with the exhibition, including a talk by Sarah Hyndman, author of Why Fonts Matter.

You can read Sarah’s interview with Design Week here. 

http://www.museumofbrands.com

Ditch the Label publish new report into cyberbullying and hate speech online

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International anti-bullying charity Ditch the Label announces findings of a major study of cyberbullying and hate speech online to coincide with anti-bullying week on Monday November 14, 2016.

Ditch the Label has partnered with leading social intelligence company Brandwatch, evaluating 19 million tweets from the US and the UK over the span of four years in order to better understand the current climate of cyberbullying and hate speech online.

The report looks at who is most likely to send abuse, who is most likely to receive it, when people are most likely to experience cyberbullying, topics most likely to precede it and how best to respond to it.

Key findings:

  • Politics is the topic most likely to receive bullying remarks, followed by topics relating to sport and food. 
  • You are most likely to experience cyberbullying on Twitter between 5pm-8pm on a Sunday.
  • Racist language was the most common form of hate speech on Twitter. Of the 19 million tweets analysed according to specific search terms, over 7.7m tweets featured racially insensitive language. Men sent 59% of these.
  • Misogynist tweets were the second most common form of hate speech with 3m of analysed tweets featuring misogynistic comments. 52% of these were sent by women. Tweets about what it means to be a man, homophobia and transphobia also featured largely.
  • Sports fans are over-represented in bullying tweets, as are executives. By contrast, teachers and scientists, as well as those interested in politics and environmental issues, are less likely to participate in online hate speech.
  • Female trolls tended to use insults relating to intelligence (dumb, stupid), appearance (fat, ugly), and derogatory animal terms (bitch, chicken), while males were more likely to use homophobic insults.
  • Responding to people who troll escalates the conflict. Research found that responding to bullying tweets escalated the conflict in 44% of cases, compared with only 3% of positive outcomes.

A full version of the report can be found here.